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on the streets of alexandria ahead of the referendum on egypt's new constitution. >> relations between russia and the european union in focus as vladimir putin plays -- pays a visit to brussels. >> and today is the start of a new era according to the ancient mayan calendar and the old one draws to an end. in egypt, the final round of a national referendum on the countries' disputed new constitution is set to start on saturday morning. most observers expect the constitution to be approved. unofficial results from the first round of voting last week showed 57% in favor of the document. >> critics say the constitution is to islamist-based and ignores the rights of women and minorities in the country. in the run-up to the vote, opponents and supporters of morsi clashed again on friday. >> "our souls and our blood we sacrifice to islam," they chanted in alexandria. thousands of muslim brotherhood supporters rallied in the city ahead of the voting on egypt's referendum on the proposed constitution. >> my message to the egyptian people is saying yes to stability. production needs to start moving. ec
in russia. siberia's move to emergency shelters as more than 100 people lose their lives -- siberia inspect -- siberians move to emergency shelters. do not ever lose hope for peace -- that is the message from the pope this christmas. >> pope benedict delivered his twice yearly address from the balcony of st. peter's basilica today. the pontiff touched on political themes as well, calling for peace in syria and appealing to italians to embrace the spirit of cooperation in upcoming elections. >> tens of thousands of people showed up in st. peter's square to hear benedict's message, and millions to and in worldwide. >> tens of thousands of people turned out to hear the pope's christmas message. the square erupted in applause as the pontiff stepped out to address the crowd. he revisited one of the themes of his christmas eve message -- the wish for peace in the middle east. turning and i to syria, he called for an end to the conflict -- turning an eye to syria. the pope appealed to those responsible to stop the bloodshed and slaughter of innocent people. he called for dialogue in order to find
and political figures. the plane was on its way to a ceremony in russia to mark the 70th anniversary of the soviet killing thousands of polish prisoners of war. when it crashed in thick fog with 96 people on board, there were all sorts of conspiracy theories swirling around. it has emerged that there were some serious mistakes made in the way the russians identified the bodies. forensic tests have shown that several people were buried in the long rates, and now more bodies are being exhumed to check their identities. >> the college president was killed with 95 others in a plane crash in russia in 2010, but in a macabre scandal, poland is still burying the dead after authorities say six bodies were misidentified and buried in the wrong graves. the first hint something was amiss was the discovery of irregularities in forensic documents sent from russia. poland's military prosecutors said they had reason to believe that the body of the country's last president in exile was not the one buried in the temple of divine providence in warsaw. he served his time while the country was still rul
of a new law in russia that bars american citizens from adopting russian children. president vladimir putin has signed the law, which places new strains on bilateral relations. >> the new law comes in response to american legislation that withholds visas to russians accused of human rights violations and freezes their u.s. assets. >> most bills signed by president putin have not been subjected to so much public scrutiny, but the ban on americans adopting russian children is controversial, so putin's strategy is to appeal to russian patriotism. >> as far as i know from opinion polls, the vast majority of russian citizens have a negative opinion of foreigners adopting our children. russia can and must look after its own children. >> at the same time, a russian judge acquitted a former prison doctor. human rights activists say he is responsible for the death of a russian lawyer in 2009. the lawyer was imprisoned after accusing russian officials of the $230 million tax fraud. since his death, relations beween the u.s. and russia have increasingly soured, culminating in the adoption van --over 7
in moscow as russia steps up its role in helping to find a political resolution to the conflict. the russian parliament says time is running out for damascus. >> it was a high-level meeting between syrian diplomats and the russian foreign minister. he made moscow's line clear -- the crisis has to be solved through political dialogue between the warring parties, but there was no mention of any new proposals to bring about that objective. the foreign ministry denied reports of a new peace plan from russia and the u.s. >> this plan does not exist. that is why it is not being discussed. with mr. brahimi and our american colleagues, we are trying to find a solution on the basis of the peace plan that was agreed upon in june. >> the geneva agreement calls for a cease-fire and the creation of a traditional government, something the united nations special envoy still wants to see. in damascus, he appealed for a government of national unity. >> this government would lead the country in a transitional phase, which would end with new elections. they could be presidential elections if the parties concer
the peak holiday travel season, and it draws attention to the poor air safety record of russia. they are looking for tighter controls. >> it happens very often. too often. >> it could have been a greater loss of life. a passenger plane can carry up to to a hundred 10 people. it was virtually empty with few core members on board. aljazeera. >> a demonstration in the capital. there were orders to clear an area for traffic. the government is hoping that keeping shops open and will help the economy. in germany, the economic performance has been strong, but their future is intricately tied to the euro zone. 2013 and angela merkel. she faces challenges on the domestic front. a report. >> let us days and look as best as we can into the crystal ball to the year ahead for angela merkel. she emerged as perhaps the world's most powerful woman, certainly germany's most popular politician, but 2013 could well be a year of living dangerously for the german chancellor. at a recent conference, she rallied the troops for an election in september. >> we have kept our promise. through our leaders
leaders have often been at loggerheads over the fighting in syria. russia is one of damascus' key allies and turkey is one of its most vocal critics. >> just before the talk, shells landed in a syrian border town. in germany, chancellor angela merkel's christian democrats have begun meeting in hanover for a party conference looking ahead to next year's elections. >> merkel's party has been grappling with consensus -- contentious issues, including whether to give same-sex part ners the same privileges which married couples enjoy. and to reelect chancellor kohl as the next party chairman -- chancellor merkel as the party chair. what is in store for this congress? >> something like a coronation. angela merkel is expected to be announced as the candidate, with the -- with something like you expect to see in the chinese congress. she is expected to receive 90% backing or more. she remains germany's most popular politician. there are no rivals insight within the party. she is the undisputed leader of the cdu. you might even say she is the cdu's main message that begins -- and at the meeting th
in washington. >>> still to congress on the show, russia has joined the wto. it did it just four months ago, but complaints with its lack of compliance with the laws are already stacking up. we'll get a view when we come back. >>> wto regulations are valid according to a top trade lawyer. karen spoke to an expert and asked why the u.s. invariably features as the main protagonist. >> i think there's a number of factors going on here. first of all, i think it's absolutely normal for the united states to be the most tiff wto dispute settlement participate. if you look at the figures, i think they have been the most active every single year since the wto was founded. it's a natural by-product of the huge size of the u.s. economy. they're the most active trading nation so they're going to trigger the most disputes. they sue the most and they are sued the most. that's absolutely normal. i think presidential politics played into this, as well. as you saw in the last stages of the campaign, both candidates, including president obama wanted to look tough on trade issues and filed a number of cases a
market economics and democracy a bad name in russia. people are still afraid of that today. >> the marathon press conference lasted four hours, but president putin had little to offer that was really new. >> it was a fighting performance by vladimir putin who likes to present himself as a faithful servant of the russian people, but there was a lack of fresh ideas and concrete answers. his words sounded a lot more like holding onto power than a new beginning for the good of russia. >> efforts to bail out ciphers are running into fresh obstacles. a german newspaper is reporting that the international monetary fund is not prepared to contribute to the bailout fund unless creditors wave part of the country's debt in what is known as a hair cut. >> the imf is concern that cypress will not be able to keep up with interest payments. it has been widely reported that nation is seeking 17 billion euros and could default if it does not receive help in the coming days. >> in germany, a surprise announcement at deutsche telekom as the chief executive says he will step down at the end of
was the beginning of the coup d'√Čtat, the soviet union. the cia spy plane was shot down over russia. the cia had suppressed a study showing the soviet antiaircraft missiles can now climb high enough to reach the u2, atlanta ike to believe the pilot would never be captured into a dive on the plane broke up or killed himself with a suicide pill. the russians captured the pilot, powers, khrushchev bloated and credit of the wicked american spies. that was the and. eisenhower was very depressed. i want to resign, he said his faithful assistant, when he came into the oval office after powers was captured and his cover story blown. ike bounced back. he always did, but after nearly eight years of constant attention he was exhausted. ike threatened to use nuclear weapons. he never told anyone whether he actually would use them. he could not, of course or his threat would no longer be credible. talk about the loneliness. ike me all about the burden, from the north african campaign in 1943 to d-day to the conquest of germany, and the liberation of europe. ike smoke four packs a day as a general. he quit co
were extraordinarily successful. archives began to open for western scholars. i worked a lot in russia during the 1990's, and i began to have the impression one of the other reasons they were open is because russians were so preoccupied with other things they did not care. as a young american woman, how could you beat walking around those archives? the idea was, she wants to look at those documents, so what? we are busy reforming our country. in 2000 putin became president of russia, and he became conscious of what history was told and how it was being told, and this trickle-down. he became more wary about what archives were opened and who had access to information. they are not totally closed, and you can still work in them. some of them become difficult, particularly the military archives. >> w bush came into the presidency. he made it difficult to get some for you could get access to his father. what is the difference between that attitude and what you have in these countries? is it a matter of degree, or do we have a different attitude? >> we believe in principle it should be open,
to open for western scholars. i worked a lot in russia during the 1990's, and i began to have the impression one of the other reasons they were open is because russians were so preoccupied with other things they did not care. as a young american woman, how could you beat walking around those archives? the idea was, she wants to look at those documents, so what? we are busy reforming our country. in 2002 and became president of russia, -- in 2000 putin became president of russia, and he became conscious of what history was told and how it was being told, and this trickle-down. he became more wary about what archives were opened and who had access to information. they are not totally closed, and you can still work in them. some of them become difficult, particularly the military archives. >> w bush came into the presidency. he made it difficult to get some for you could get access to his father. what is the difference between that attitude and what you have in these countries? is it a matter of degree, or do we have a different attitude? >> we believe in principle it should be o
to face. when russia, he had to meet them, take the measure, and make him his partner in avoiding war. the issue, ike wrote, in a smart letter to a friend in 1956, quote, is not merely man against man or nation against nation. it is man against war. in the summer of 1959, ike invited crus choof to the united states, and they went over the suburbs to see houses and cars, and he pretended to see just the rush hour traffic jams but asked to buy three hell cometters and a boeing 747. [laughter] he met marilyn monroe. ike invited him to camp david. where is this camp david, he asked? he was suspicious, wondering if the americans wanted to kidnap him. at camp david, ranted and threatened that the tanks would roll in berlin. the top aide wrote impasse on a piece of paper. ike took a nap and had an idea. ike's farm was close by. called his darnel, barbara, and told her to have the kids all spruced up on the porch of the farmhouse in 30 minutes. he brought him to meet them. ike's great insight about him was that he was a survivor. he survived hitler and stalin, after all. the kremlin leaders,
tie onin -- tycoon in 1998. and at this moment he was the richest man in russia, but russia had just experienced its default and devaluations. so he was in kind of a bad mood. and this is what he said to me about oligarchs and everybody else. if a man is not an oligarch, something is not right with him. everyone had the same starting conditions, everyone could have done it. and he really meant it, you know? it was very, very heartfelt. and he was particularly -- he was kind of criticizing himself in this because he had lost a couple of hundred million dollars because he had stupidly entrusted a nonoligarch, there therefore, not a true man, with running his bank, and this nonoligarch -- by definition, not a smart guy -- had the loss of a few hundred million bucks. but that is, you know, there's a little bit of that thinking in a lot of these guys, and it's interesting because i came across, i think there are very strong parallels, i won't have time to talk about all of them. but in my book i talk about the parallels of industrial revolution. and there's a line from andrew carnegie whi
the british empire. we are cutting power, so does russia because they grow during the war. they arm themselves and remake themselves. it's an extraordinary story. migration and deconstruction and the losses of the soviets, whether it's 22 or 20 million, doesn't matter. the idea of the whole nation plunged into this thing. it was a crucible for them. a great war. but the british -- churchill has a different motive. once the british islands are saved by the -- in the battle of britain, is goal seems to be to regain the empire. he said i did not become prime minister to dismember the british empire, and the whole consent of going into north africa, sending troops to the belly of the nazi empire, regaining greece, which is a tremendous story -- everyone talks about eastern europe. what bet the british when they went back into greece in 1944 and started dive-bombing the streets of athen and killing'm residents who fought against the nazis and that's never pointed out. look at what stalin did in poland. he broke this and that. i don't believe he broke yalta. look what the british did. no one ever po
over internet use and content. the changes were supported by 89 countries including russia, china, and saudi arabia. >> coming up, as egypt prepares to vote, why is the new constitution so divisive? we will talk about that. >> the fate of children in afghanistan as nato troops prepare to withdraw. >> stay with us. >> welcome back, everyone. each faces a tense weekend. voting begins on a controversial constitution supported by president mohamed morsi. it has deeply divided the country. >> opposition groups are urging supporters to vote against it. morsi oppose the muslim brotherhood is calling on egyptians to support the document. -- morsi's muslim brotherhood is calling the egyptians to support the document. >> opponents said the document does not do enough to protect women and minorities. the leading activist has asked egypt's president to delay the referendum. >> it is shaping up to be a pivotal moment for the country which has witnessed daily violence in the run-up to the referendum. >> we want to get a closer look at some of the most disputed articles of the new constitution.
the craft about two days to reach the iss. vulcanologists in russia have been able to get a glimpse of a spectacular eruption in siberia. it began erupting in late november. >> huge areas of the surrounding tundra and wildlife have been destroyed by the lava stream. it is pouring out thousands of tons of law every second. the volcano last erupted in the 1970's in one is -- in what is one of the world's most volcanic regions. >> stay with us. you are watching the "journal" coming to you from dw in berlin. after a short break, we look at how more and more journalists are coming under harms way than ever before. >> welcome back. every so often, we are reminded that journalism can be a dangerous occupation. reporters without borders says 2012 was the deadliest year for journalists since it began collecting statistics in 1995. >> a few days ago, a high- profile reporter from u.s. tv station nbc escaped death when he broke free from his kidnappers in syria, but many journalists have not been so lucky. >> the civil war in syria has made it the world's most dangerous place for journalists.
by the end of february. >> in russia, a bill banning american citizens from adopting russian children has won final approval from parliament there. >> president vladimir putin has already hinted he will sign it. angry citizens gathered in front of parliament to protest. they say children should not become victims of politics. the ban 1 unanimous support in the upper house of parliament. moscow sees the bill of -- as retaliation. all of us have been to london know and love the city's uniquely spacious yet somewhat old-fashioned black cabs. they are as much a part of the british capital as the big ben on the tower bridge. >> no wonder then there was a huge outcry when back in october the company making those calves filed for bankruptcy. what's worse, the london taxi company had to recall a large number of the calves once renowned for their reliability. -- a large number of the tabs -- cabs once renowned for their reliability. >> not all the caps on the streets of the traditional black cabs and more. martin has driven a taxi in london for 18 years. he would rather not give his last name because
of modern totalitarianism, first not see germany and now communist russia. and on like chambers, we believe that the united states would eventually turn back the communist threat to western civilization, just as surely as it had done to the equally evil threat posed by not to germany. not, mind you, that we underestimated the might of the soviet military or the strength and the resolve of the anti anti-communist forces. against as both at home and abroad. in fact, there were times when we came close to a feeling that chambers and other conservative anti-communist like james vernon who wrote a book entitled suicide of the last, we feared that they might be right. for me, one especially discouraging occasion was the fight against ronald reagan's decision in 1983 to station medium-range misfiles in europe to counter the soviet buildup of similar misfiles on its side of the dividing line between its domain and the west. massive protests were planned here at home and all over the world with the biggest one scheduled for the aid to which over a million people from every country in western europe
assume you were talking about soviet russia and nazi germany. were these regimes possible because of the uniformity? if that is the case, how did the myriad number of protestant denominations in the united states provide a unique defense against tyranny? >> i would not say -- i was not referring to just the soviet union and nazi germany. communist china killed far more of those two tyrannies combined, with no christian heritage to speak of. there are serious scholars that makes serious arguments that there is something and luther's temperament that was germanic. he was no democrat. the more, the merrier. religious factions or alternative sources of social authority. what you want is a society in which the state does not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do not think is the case. just because you are r
in the mideast if peace can't be negotiated. but russia's foreign minister said his government still backs the regime. a russian passenger jet crashed today while landing, it happened at moscow's airport. the plane split off -- slid off the runway, broke apart and caught fire. four crew members were killed. the plane had been flying without passengers. still ahead, a life lesson for one boy is now helping thousands of san diego's homeless. first, she served in iraq, now she's trying to win her battle with depression. and nine weeks after superstorm sandy, people are still suffering. when the cbs evening news continues. >> happy holidays from kabul, afghanistan, i'm p. f. c. jones from charleston, south carolina, happy new year to my family and friend back home, tops my wife and daughter in germany. i miss you, love you and will see you soon.it comes we understand. milies fa, at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad!
a tiny fraction of this to deal with china or russia t our nuclear arsenal isn't stopping iran from trying to achieve its nuclear weapon. these are sad, missed opportunities to right size the military which will still be the most powerful in the world by far. for us to deal with veterans' needs. mr. mcgovern: additional one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. blumenauer: for us to deal with the threats that we face today, to deal with the damage that we have done in the misguided war in iraq. to be able to deal meaningfully with the guard and ready reserve that should be upgraded and healed from the damage that was inflicted upon him. we can provide far more real security, save tax dollars, deal with the needs of veterans that are about to be, sadly, undercut , and provide balance to our budget. because, in fact, the fiscal instability for reckless -- from reckless bills like that is in fact a national security threat. we are no longer going to be able to pay almost half the world's entire military budget. we should start by rejecting this authorization
? because we've seen reports about, you know, wealthy migrants and specialists visas, coming to russia and the chinese who. are the people that are happy to buy? >> it makes a very, very small -- buying in the streets in central london. >> you might be right. >> so that's not the market. certainly not the figures that land registry are talking about there in terms of a slowdown. the slowdown is it's sort of normal people working here, including overseas. we rely on a large overseas highly skilled professional contingent who are here, or educated here. and they're the people who are either -- buying and trying to get their first homes, or sort of moving up. it's very little to buy. >> how different is the short-term prognosis for the long-term? you sponsored this report. michael ball in business school, who said that in the end, property prices in particular were meant to go nowhere but up. why is he arguing that? >> the issue is that london is a growing city and we want it to grow and the economy to grow. the fact that we're not building, the green belt is constraining us, so we've got
? >> in 2013? >> yes. >> i suppose i get around to see more of europe. i would love to go to russia and see moscow and st. petersburg. >> don't go in the wintertime, that's all i can say. >> and yours? >> i used to do all the die hard type travel adventure stuff and now i just want a nice beach. mall tease you can never go wrong or the greek islands. i've never tried that yet. so that has to go on the list, as well. >> sounds good. >> for the weekend, quick jump to italy. >> i still haven't been at all. so add me to that list. i'd go anywhere. >> you can join christian and the family. >> thank you for the invite. i'm looking forward to it. >> sicily sounds beautiful. >> on that note, we would like to know where you are heading this year, greece, bangkok? dividually, too. us and reach us now that instagram is changing its policies, we'll see what its users will look like next year. >> i need to get on instagram, as well. i can't type on it. writing takes me 200,000 years. anyway, christian, next year, 2013, what type of a year do you think we'll get? >> well, 13 is not a lucky number, but i
, that would not be the first time trouble in the 1990's coming of asia, russia. so we have double the ability to international shock that could bring the crisis on him even if we are in export of that part of the financial crisis. >> host: thank you for holding you're on book tv on c-span2. >> caller: are you uremia okay? >> host: we are listening. please go ahead, sir. >> caller: first off, i just realized i got neal's but from the library. i was on hold for six weeks. it's a popular book. my question as to why he mentioned that he is a democrat. his high level, i wonder how the place. is it important? as he does his work, is it on his forehead, oh, he is a democrat. what geithner deferred to him as opposed to republican? how does that play at that very high level of politics? >> guest: i would say that the only time a really benefited me in any way, shape or form was during the confirmation process. the fact that george w. bush had nominated a democrat for this gem sort of gave me a level of credibility that i was not -- for a person died would be a political guy, was the prosecutor. on the
numbers were being sent to russia to die. when the germans surrendered and the japanese were pushed back to their home island, the american propensity to save the human lives while wasting cheaper bullets and bombs reached its zenith with the dropping of the two atomic bombs. virtually all of the relevant evidence, recent evidence from both american and japanese sources nowadays president harry truman's decision to drop both bombs. japanese leaders did not display the slightest acknowledgment of military reality, illustrated by the report of a doctor. japan's top atomic scientist who was sent down to the regime of the following day and he had to report back to the emperor. and he was asked was this an atomic bomb? yes, it's an atomic bomb. then came the line, how long till we get when? it's hardly the response of somebody looking for a way to surrender. truman intended to show japan that he would use any weapon at our disposal. there was no atomic diplomacy. he wanted to show the japanese that it was surrender or die. when japan 70, came the victory of the principles of american exceptio
not stand the wake of the soviet union. there was a movement in russia to and secrecy and to discuss the past openly. this was an authentic movement on the ground up and people at the top sympathize with it. the archives began to open in the '90s and were in some ways extraordinarily accessible working with western scholars. there are many instances of that. i did begin to have the impression pours into the '90s, i began to have the impression that one of the other reasons why they were open was because the russians were so preoccupied with other things at that time that they didn't really care. people have often said to me how as a young american, an american woman how cute you be wondering around those archives? i think the attitude was, she wants to look at old documents, so what? what? we are busy proof reforming our economy. what happened is putin became president of russia and he had a much more instrumental idea of what it was for anti-read politicized history and began to become much more conscious overworked history was told and how it was being told. this really trickles do
in the daily beast, "the best hope to avoid syria becoming a failed or radical islamist state is for the russia and u.s. to cooperate." you write that russia may be shifting its pro-assad position. at this point, do you think that russia leadership and the united states can get together on syria? >> you know, i think that the russians now understand that the regime probably isn't going to survive. however, i don't think that the russians are going to get actively involved with us in any effort to militarily intervene in syria. i think that their hope is to protect their interests, that if there's going to be a new regime, that they keep their investments and naval facilities, but i don't think they're going to join with us in getting involved. >> what do we know about the scope, the size, and the variety of the syrian chemical -- of their chemical weapons stash? >> well, in that -- the syrians, of course, have denied they don't have any. that there's not that public information revealed about i, but i think it's pretty clear. they do have a chemical weapons stash, and whatever it is it's too mu
the united kingdom, france, germany, china, russia has ratified it. now you can pass anything in the senate with 60 votes. except treaties which require 66. a two-thirds majority. every democrat voted for the treaty and only eight republicans voted for the treaty. 38 republicans disgraced themselves and disgraced the senate. by voting against it and controlling the outcome. john kerry tried everything he could on the senate floor to show republicans the way to vote for this treaty. >> it really isn't controversial. what this treaty says is very simple. it just says that you can't discriminate against the disabled. it says that other countries have to do what we did 22 years ago when we set the example for the world and passed the americans with disabilities act. >> the treaty was supported by organizations representing people with disabilities and veterans groups but that was not good enough for 38 republicans. it was supported by senator john mccain, himself a disabled veteran. >> bob dole has been our leader on the issue of disabilities from the moment he stepped foot into the chamber. to
christmas tree in the kremlin. it's the biggest in russia. designers decorated it using a patriotic theme mixing the colors of the russian flag, red, white, and blue. and finally, syria. in a country now engaged in civil war these peaceful christmas scenes stand in stark contrast. true spirit of christmas, peace, joy, somehow in the middle of the chaos syrians taking a few precious moments to remember. well, we all know the song even if we don't know all the words. 12 days of christmas except of course 5 golden rings we know. this christmas those rings, everything else on the list there, a lot more expensive making the 12 days of christmas a very expensive tradition especially in these struggling times. richard qwest from london is adding up the tab. >> reporter: so you've decided to be very traditional in your christmas presents this year. and you're going to buy the 12 days of christmas. you know, all the items that are in the song well pnc bank has worked out how much it will cost and it is 5% more expensive this year than last year. and this is why. let's start with the partridge in a
countries. >> well, the two leaders, strong men of russia and turkey, they sat down and they signed at least 11 trade agreements, and really applauded what they say is expected $35 billion in bilateral trade by the end of this year. they're really trying to accentuate the positive, but the questions that people raise to these leaders were all about syria. with turkish journalists clearly concerned about the possibility of syrian weapons hitting turkey, the russian president trying to downplay russia's traditional support for the embattled syrian regime claiming, hey, we're not exactly defense attorneys for syria, but in the same breath the russian president went on to say that he opposed the possible deployment of patriot missile batteries along the turkish-syrian border. he drew a comparison. he said it's like the beginning of a play in a theater when there's a gun hanging somewhere on the stage in the first act, you expect that gun to be fired before the curtain falls at the end of the play. he is arguing that this is going to do nothing to diminish the already very tense situation on the
with russia as the single largest producer of natural gas in the world could find itself the world's biggest oil producer on a consistent basis for the first time since the first half of the 20th century. in energy circles you hear the phrase saudi america used to refer to this future fossil fuel juggernaut. you might look at this and say fantastic. america is finally into sight of that promised destination, energy independence. not only can we cheaply supply our own power grid and vehicles and army, we can make money all over the world reversing the long trend toward ever wide trading imbalances. during the campaign this was more or less the argument president obama made. >> we have increased oil production for the highest levels in 16 years. we're actually drilling more on public lands than in the previous administration. we're less dependent on foreign oil than any time in 20 years. we're moving in the right direction in terms of energy independent. we've built enough pipeline to wrap around the entire earth. >> delighting in our carbon extraction boom is staggeringly almost psychopath th
.com. these stories are trending now on the web. the crisis in syria is getting worse, according to russia's top diplomat. the foreign minister says fighting is becoming more sectarian and more violence. 364 people died in fighting today alone. both men called for a transition from the al assad government. russia seems to be backing off its strong support for that regime. >>> police in los angeles have arrested comic cat williams for allegedly en dangering his four children. that according to tmz. police found guns and drugs in the house, calling them a safety hazard. the children are in protective protect. williams posted bail and walked out of jail. >>> and yoko ono is finally having her say about the longstanding question over the beatles' break-up. she blames paul mccartney, period. the beatle of john lennon says the others just did not like it. >>> after the school shooting in newtown, it seems like everyone wants to do something to help this grieving community. now they'll get some help from these therapy horses. magic and wakota are two specially trained mini horses from a gainesville, fl
. but competitors in china are, rush show were trading on a daily basis. -- my competitors in china and russia work training. this is a position of irritation of a triple jump. i was like a robot in the sense that everything i was doing, the hours i was putting in it, the morning, the afternoon, the evening, i trained all they basically. my first session, 10:00, i was basically of the rank by nine and my last session would be at 6:00-6:30. then i would go to the gym. i look back, no wonder i was in really good shape. >> where did that drive? how did that drive? where do you get that drive? >> we were talking earlier about the role of parents. when you had mentioned the tiger mom or the tiger parents, we did not have tiger parents. they were there to support me and be there in times when i needed a push culminated motivation. it is just one of those things when you have a passion and a vision. you do not see anything else. that is what drives you every day. >> you just got engaged. are you going to be a tiger mom. [laughter] >> looking at the way i was raised with a set of rules and just the way my
for the massacre of his own people. if everything chances around him he's count on russia getting him out and getting asylum in moscow or tehran. and there is a good chance he will get no matter what he does. the question is not whether -- what he gains by using these chemical weapons, these horrific weapons, but why wouldn't he use them. he's fighting for the life of his regime. he does remember the example of qaddafi. and he may want to take revenge on his own people. never under estimate and emotional response. i would give full credit to the idea he may turn chemical weapons on his own people as a last resource and fully expect to get away with it. megyn: we have been showing some of the devastation in syria. i believe that school that was bombed not by the assad regime. both sides guilty of horrific violence and assad has shown very little heart in this whole matter. the torture and murder of children in front of their families and making them watch as their families are murdered. it's hard to believe he wouldn't unleash sarin gas on some of these people. can you talk about that. wou
its international expansion like in russia yesterday. if you remember, renault and its japanese party nissan finalized its acquisition of a controlling stake in the russian carmaker. the deal is valued at $742 million and will give them a 67% stake in the joint venture controlling atovalve. renault wants to refocus its business on emerging countries that it's facing a sharp decline of its sales in europe since the beginning of the year. its sales in europe dropped by 18% with the european car sector shrunk by nor than 7%. >> stephane pedrazzi, following the latest in the european car industry. now, google has released a new downloadable maps app for the iphone. this comes after am removed google maps in favor of its own software. that app led to an apology from app apple's ceo tim cook. the new map allows for turn by turn basis. it is available for download now from the itunes apps store. both apple and google shares are down about .5% and that is in line with what we're seeing in the broader index. so now, american airlines critters reportedly would prefer an all-stock merger with ri
more people than religious faiths. i can only assume you were talking about soviet russia and nazi germany. were these regimes possible because of the uniformity? if that is the case, how did the myriad number of protestant denominations in the united states provide a unique defense against tyranny? >> i would not say -- i was not referring to just the soviet union and nazi germany. communist china killed far more of those two tyrannies combined, with no christian heritage to speak of. there are serious scholars that makes serious arguments that there is something and luther's temperament that was germanic. he was no democrat. the more, the merrier. religious factions or alternative sources of social authority. what you want is a society in which the state does not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do
collapsed, places like russia, eastern europe. and for the rest of the world growth has basically meant increases in carbon. so the idea that comes from mainstream economics that you can decouple carbon from the size of the economy is not at all born out over the last 20 years. >> it's born out of germany. if someone can do it, it can be done, right? is that the answer? >> well, they've had very little slow gdp growth. and there they are an unusual economy. they've been able to export a lot of their -- big export surplus. >> everyone want to be germany. in the future, we will all be net exporters. >> can i make what is going to sound in this context like the naive case for growth and remind us why -- >> i want you to. >> why it's actually important? so, you know, let's stipulate yes, climate change is really important and, yes, juliet is absolutely right. it's really hard to do both at the same time but we have to be really careful to sort of -- it can be easy to say, let's forget about growth. all of these other things, children playing and being happy are so important. the reality is
with mother nature in this way could have hugely negative consequences. russia 1.43 and germany, 1.41. at the very bottom of the list, other than certain countries where the information is not available, the bottom of this list was singapore at .78. i know we're dealing with so many issues nowadays and i blow a gasket over many of them, whether fiscal cliff, unfunded liabilities, at some point, growth is the answer. when you start considering where the engines of growth have been and what their population declines may be, it makes one wonder, where is the horsepower from global growth will come from and this at some point needs to affect the picks in your stock portfolio. back to you. >> rick, i'll take it from you, rick santelli. >>> even starbucks is worried about the fiscal cliff. and we'll take you live to one of those location as they launch their initiative. back in two. to live a better retirement. it's called a reverse mortgage. [ male announcer ] call right now to receive your free dvd and booklet with no obligation. it answers questions like how a reverse mortgage works,
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